Recent Happenings

Recent Happenings

 

I have been away from my quilt studio recently along with anything remotely related to today’s communications.  I only feel it is fair that along with my long arm quilting that I share with you some of the beauty of the great state of Alaska.  While out in the wilderness, I enjoyed picking wild blueberries, sitting back to enjoying the scenery and harvesting my very first Caribou.  My hobbies are of a unique blend such as hunting, fishing, camping, hiking, sewing, quilting, crafting, motorcycle riding and football.  I am the third daughter and my father’s tomboy, so I grew up spending much of my time with my dad, uncles and the guys.  My mother took every opportunity to make sure that I received enough girl time to understand and learn how to be feminine when necessary.  So to sum it up…I enjoy a bit of both worlds.  Here are some photos of my recent happenings:

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Raven Wallhanging by Lynda K

Raven Wallhanging by Lynda K

Fresh off the frame today and ready for pick up is this beautiful Raven Wall Hanging made by Lynda K.  Although, another member of this household wishes to keep this one for himself! It is custom design quilted with thread colors to fit each element.

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Betty L Necktie Quilt 2

Betty L Necktie Quilt 2

The second Necktie Quilt has been completed using a variety of design layouts with computerized patterns and some freehand work.  Now to get it packaged and sent back to Pennsylvania.

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Waiting, argh…

My previous post with the necktie quilt, was the last quilting I have done.  My sewing room currently stands mostly empty and waiting is now the name of the game.  So for those of you that are not in contact with me daily here is the story.

I decided it was time to upgrade my longarm quilting machine.  After weeks of mind bending deliberation, my choice fell on the Gammill Statler Stitcher 30-12 Optimum.  To break it down for those who are not familiar with machine lingo, it is just a big sewing machine on a 12 foot long table.  In my eyes it is the “cream de’ lacream” (sp) and every time I think about owning it, I get shivers.  Yes, I may be sounding a bit childish in my verbage; but that is how I feel about having another of my dreams about to come true.

The new machine was ordered on March 8th and was tentative for delivery in about four weeks.  I still had my Nolting Fun Quilter that was for sale on the well-known Craig’s List.  I had not received a single call for two weeks and then got three calls within two days.  The first showing brought its new owner to light, within a few hours it was taken apart, loaded, transported and reconstructed at its new location.  That evening although delighted with the sale of the complete Nolting machine and frame, instead of just trading in the machine; I was not sure if I felt happy or sad that my first longarm machine was gone.

I contacted my Gammill dealer to alter my invoice since I no longer had a trade-in on my new machine; then, several days passed when I got the bad news.  My new machine was delayed due to bad weather and would be an extra two weeks out.  I was bummed…making the best of it, I decided to attempt to complete a few UFO’s (unfinished objects) in my sewing room.  I decided on a new technique for making fabric note cards, purchased the needed fabric to finish my “Kwik Krazy Quilt” pattern, reorganize the stuff on the book shelves to more efficiently hold my quilting items and be more diligent at the process of completing the “Octagon Flower Bed” quilt for my mom that I am hand quilting.  Speaking of hand quilting, I totally give credit to those with healthy backs who can undertake this task for more than an hour at a time.

Back to the main subject, so here I sit typing this post and thinking that my new machine is still two weeks out.  The telephone rings and it is the Gammill dealer calling to tell me that she had info that I was probably not going to like.  My heart sank in my chest as I asked using all the strength I could muster, what the news was?  She said that she just checked on the machine and it is going to be delivered on Monday.  OH MY GOODNESS, that is only three days away!!  Her laughter rang in my ears, as I expressed my joy at her joking about the bad news.  The new machine is currently scheduled to be assembled in my Sewing Room on Wednesday, which is only five days from now; not two weeks!

Now, I ask myself what I will do with my mind over the next five days so that I don’t go crazy with excitement?  Until next time, BEE Happy!bumble bee2

Betty L ~ Necktie Quilt

Betty L ~ Necktie Quilt

This quilt is made from the neckties of a gentleman who has gone to be with the Lord.  It is one of two quilts being made from his ties for his children. Measuring up to a King size quilt has been a learning process for both the creator consisting of hand stitching the ties together and appliqué stitching to a large piece of muslin; the quilter who needed to reduce bulk and fill in the puffiness. The center is made from the main part of the tie and the four corner fans created from the skinny end of the ties used in the middle. The quilt was assembled in Pennsylvania then packaged and sent to Alaska for quilting.

When I received the box it was very heavy and I did not understand why? Upon opening it I realized that the ties were complete with several layers of fabric. I never really knew how a tie was constructed until now. I carefully snipped away the muslin behind the circle of ties and stripped them down to just the thin layer of fabric from the front of the tie. I basted a high-loft batting on the back of the ties to fill up the loose tie fabric. Deciding on a light weight poly batting to cover the entire quilt along with a single cut of backing fabric, to help minimize the weight. After several weeks of mental design process, I finally put ideas to stencil, loaded the quilt on the frame, decided on thread color and needle size. Only thing left to do was turn on the radio and quilt. Ten hours, a few thread breaks and needle changes later; it was time to celebrate the quilt was stitched and ready to be removed from the long-arm frame.

The only dilemma I still face is packaging it for its return trip to Pennsylvania for the final binding stage… Oh, and did I mention that this was only one of the TWO!

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